Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Programming Post: Fandom Guess Who

Do you guys remember the old board game "Guess Who?" It was basically a 20-questions type of game where your opponent chose a character from a game board, then you asked them a series of yes/no questions to try and guess who they had chosen.

For those not familiar, it looked like this.

Since, as you know by now if you have ever read this blog, I happen to love turning  live-action versions of classic board and video games in to programs, I decided to update the game to be more appealing to my teens and created my own "Fandom Guess Who" game.

I created my game board on Publisher, on an 8.5" by 14" piece of paper. I chose 30 characters that I liked from a variety of different Fandoms (15 females and 15 males).

The fandoms I chose were:
Marvel
Disney
Steven Universe
Anime (Studio Ghibli, Dragon Ball and Naruto, to be more specific)
Harry Potter
Voltron
Game of Thrones
Stranger Things
Riverdale
Star Wars
Rick and Morty
Video Games (Bendy and the Ink Machine and Super Mario)
Supernatural
Doctor Who and
Adventure Time.

I found images of each character standing alone, and used them to make a board that was 5 characters across by 5 characters down. Then I used the same images to create a deck of cards from which I could choose the character that was to be guessed.

This was my finished play board.

The rules were:
Only Yes/No type questions are allowed.
Only one question per person per round.
The group gets 20 questions total to make a guess, but guesses can be made at any time after the first question has been asked.
If you make a guess, and guess wrong, you you lose your next turn.
You may NOT ask any questions about a character's age.
You may NOT as any questions about a character's race, gender, species or skin color.
You may not ask any questions about a character's age.
You may not ask if a character is human or a cartoon.

Play can be done with any size group, (up to 20, since there are only 20 questions) but I would not recommend playing with more than 10 at a time to give everyone the chance to potentially ask at LEAST one question.

In addition to the board, each player needs some kind of marker to "block out" the characters they think have been excluded. If the boards are laminated, dry-erase markers are great, if not: beans, buttons or any small objects you have lots of will do.

It's a really easy and fun game, doesn't take a ton of work to put together, and costs virtually nothing. The teens enjoy it because they get to challenge and try to stump the staff while having fun. Plus you can play it any time, and practically anywhere.


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